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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 141 (some duplicates have been removed)
these different languages and religions and basically for the first 50 years, almost -- certainly first several decades, people back in washington were saying, what have we done here? we've conquered this land but dough don't understand and it we can't good afternoon it. we should just give it back. give it back to mexico. it's too hard to run this place. there was so much violence. there was slavery and there was hostage taking and -- just unfamiliar country that people in washington didn't know what to do with. that's part two. part three is about kit carson's role in the conquest of the navajo people, and everything he did with that. monster slayer it's called, and this is from the final act of his long career, and it's probably what he is best known for, this sort of a scorched earth campaign he led into navajo country that resulted in their conquest and their removal from their beloved lands, and this great experiment that went on to try to force the navajo to become -- to settle down and become farmers and christians living in this sort of reservation on the border with texas. so it's a b
religion. his agent comes out and says he's going to take this training now where he's going to talk to at-risk gay kids in san francisco. i don't know what that means. only thing i know is that ray lewis had it exactly right. when ray lewis was asked this question, he said, you know what, i'm not here to talk about world issues, i'm here to talk about locker room issues. that's a veteran move. >> we're going to talk about ray lewis. you're right, all of a sudden, though, people find religion when you start talking about taking things away from them and their bank account and all of a sudden they find religion like, oh, i didn't mean him. i'm not homophobic or racist. we're going to -- stick around, guys. we're going to talk about ray lewis. no stranger to controversies or super bowls. [ female announcer ] born from the sweet monk fruit, something this delicious could only come from nature. new nectresse. the 100% natural no-calorie sweetener made from the goodness of fruit. new nectresse. sweetness naturally. new nectresse. all right that's a fifth-floor probleok.. not in my house! ha ha
-rights laws that prohibit firing, promoting and hiring based on race, age, national origin, religion, pregnancy, those immutable characteristics that we think are worthy of the protection of our civil rights laws. in most states there are modest exemptions to the employment at will dadoctrine, amount wrongful discharge. when an employer requires someone to break the law in order to keep their job. or if an employer is doing something that is in violation of a well-defined written public policy. other than that, we give employers in this country wi de latitude, because we have a free market economy, because we recognize the person that takes the risk and set up a business and puts their monetary and human capital into it, that they have rights to run their business the way they see fit. we are very, very reluctant to place any sort of restrictions on that. again, this is a small one. not saying that you have to hire anybody that is not fully qualified for your job. in essence, what these laws do rainout are saving employers from themselves, because if they are ignoring all of the unem
in prayer each week, members of the prayer caucus also work together to preserve the presence of religion, faith and morality in the marketplace of ideas. we're seeing increased efforts to remove references to god and fate from the public square. activists seek to remove god from our national motto and pledge of allegiance. they seek to prevent city and county councils from praying and recognizing our nation's spiritual heritage. and they seek to silence people who wish to live out their faith. members of the prayer caucus have countered these efforts successfully, ensuring that our history remains in tact for future generations. in the 112th congress, i introduced a resolution reaffirming our national motto, in god we trust, and encouraging its public display in public buildings. the measure passed overwhelmingly by a vote of 396-0. some asked why we needed to reaffirm our national motto. yet if left unstated, the motto could be changed in a de facto matter. in november, 2010, before a worldwide audience and a much publicized speech focusing on the united states relationship -- united st
for the president and members of congress to show off their religion one day a year? >> i think it's very odd. i think that there is a little too much overt religiosity going on. and then it suddenly put back in the pocket and then -- >> bill: no, i agree. i grew up under the creed that you did not wear your religion on your sleeve. and you know, you had it. it was real. it was genuine but you didn't brag about it. the problem i have with the prayer breakfast is everybody gets up and tries to outdo each other and how my faith is so strong and i pray all the time and i'm so close to jesus. come on. >> right. exactly. >> bill: it is not something to brag about. i don't think it's real if you brag about it. >> are you allowed to be diverse at the prayer breakfast? >> bill: no. no. it is one way. something else, sort of kind of related. we talked earlier in the week, victoria, about the fact that we've struggled with same-sex marriage in this country for so long, the president came around on it last year after evolving, he said. he did evolve. in the right direction. and took him a long time. but st
the corner -- what gets me is how all of a sudden they get this sensitivity religion. his agent comes out and says he's going to take this training now where he's going to talk to at-risk gay kids in san francisco. i don't know what that means. only thing i know is that ray lewis had it exactly right. when ray lewis was asked this question, he said, you know what, i'm not here to talk about world issues, i'm here to talk about locker room issues. that's a veteran move. >> we're going to talk about ray lewis. you're right, all of a sudden, though, people find religion when you start talking about taking things away from them and their bank account and all of a sudden they find religion like, oh, i didn't mean him. i'm not homophobic or racist. we're going to talk about ray lewis. no stranger to controversies or super bowls. all stations come over to mission a for a final go. this is for real this time. step seven point two one two. verify and lock. command is locked. five seconds. three, two, one. standing by for capture. the most innovative software on the planet... dragon is captured. is
. religion does well. this wall behind the paperback fiction combat rolls out here on a steady basis. both for locals and visitors who want something light to read. the author breakfast meats here all winter long before the metropolitan opera, which comes to santa fe along with millions of other viewers across the world. there is a breakfast and a lecture here. we do a lot with music and arts. the history of santa fe is vivid with two major cultures. native american, hispanic, and the anglo. now, that is actually oversimplifying things, but each one carries such a heritage that the writers are anxious to share. we boast the best of the young native american writers working today. we do events here. we boast the best spanish colonial art market. we sell books at the indian market, which is the largest art market in the world. for many years we have sold looks in the spanish market. again, the largest hispanic market in the world. we are falling all over each other but the sharing and the support that is universal makes it such a wonderfully exciting place to be. >> in the very early day, sa
cakes to same-sex couples. the owner said that he's not homophobic but stands along to his religion. >>> the church posted a gay pride banner. the youth organization is set to discuss lifting the bans on gays and lesbians this week. >>> turning to sports. the super bowl was thriller. in the first quarter, joe flacco connected with anquan boldin for a touchdown pass. in the second quarter, baltimore scored two more touchdowns to make it look a blowout. they went to halftime with a 21-6 lead over san francisco. in the third, ravens' jacoby jones set a record with 108-yard kickoff return. and then, the power went out in the superdome. it took 34 minutes before the lights were back on and play was restarted. then, momentum shifted quickly as san francisco scored two touchdowns in less than 2 1/2 minutes. in the fourth quarter, niners' quarterback colin kaepernick rolled left and kept going for the touchdown. san francisco had the last you shot at the end zone, but there was contact between michael crabtree and ravens' jeremy smith. the game ended on a ravens' kickoff. 49ers returned as
in the classrooms, particularly say on the subject of religion? >> well, in the hearing, i asked the question about a less on on islam that was sent to me by an enterprising parent and let me share this with you, alisyn, it was parents doing their homework and trying to get information that brought this to our committee's attention and so they found this lesson on islam and in texas we do teach all religions and students should learn about all religions, parents, i found it odd a full lesson on islam and not equal on christianity or any other religion. in the last segment, the answer was we changed that and that's not the program now and that's the danger of online learning, online learning is the future and it's terrific that, that's how students learn. if they're learning history and see the name patrick henry and it's linked to patrick henry, they can go in areas they can never go in a textbook. >> that's the wave of the future, so, how can you be sure of what the kids in texas and across the country are going to be taught. how can you change this curriculum now? >> yes. >> well, we're going to
that was all because we had to bowed down to the religion of the free market and what can never be repaid regarding t.a.r.p. is the contradiction, the double standard that when the plutocrats got into trouble, all of that garbage about the free market milton friedman and all that stuff got thrown a right out the window and said it is the double standard. it's the hypocrisy, the contradiction that can never be repaid. thanks. >> guest: let me talk about that because the caller raises an interesting point and this is something i've put a report out this past week. one of the things we learned in 2008 is that our financial system was very vulnerable to these highly interconnected financial institutions, these too big to fail companies. not only were the highly interconnected with each other, but what they learned is that their failure actually threatened american jobs and american pensions and american mortgages and that was shocking. i don't think that the regulators were prepared to deal with that and so even with the bailout coming at preventing the failure of some of the institutions, th
muslims, more problems. >> yeah, because their religion requires them to wage jihad. if you are a muslim, up better be out there jihadding away. >> which explains all the wars we've had with ms. lums in indonesia, india and dearborn, michigan. clearly we need new tanks or new money but don't worry the army has a great way of raising some. >> one of the ways that we kept equipment costs down is we sell it to our friends. the saudis, kuwaities, egyptians. >> waiting we're selling our bad ass tanks to muslims? our general military issues and affairs expert is going to flip. >> selling our tanks to saudi arabia is not a likely scenario. >> just so you we are selling our tanks. >> we are? >> that's right. >> i don't -- i haven't followed that aspect of the story. if we're selling tanks to saudi arabiaans, good. they are our allies in some respects. >> some respects, not good enough. i gotta get rid of these tanks before our jihadi frenive enemies get ahold of them. >> we have tanks. at big al's tank em poreium. they are do it all. of course, getting traffic! [laughter] we'll not be undersold
to come together and to come up with a reasonable solution here that would not infringe on a religion and also keep women protected and you had those i guess attempting to enflame this as a war on religion and the other things that were accused. when we talked with you and when you became a household name at the beginning of this story. >> yeah. this is just another step in what the administration has said that they wanted to do, which you're exactly right. to find a path forward to cover health care without infringing on a potential concern. and i think what's important to note is some of the folks continuing to object to this policy are actually worried about employer who is are private companies not religiously affiliated employers in any way but the boss has a particular religious concern and they want to deny their employees particular types of health care. if you take a step back and think about that, that's you work at a restaurant, you work at a store and your boss is able to deny you leukemia coverage or blood transfusions or any number of medical concerns someone might have
in the battle with some religion non-profit organizations over the requirement they offer birth control coverage in their health insurance packages. while today's shift is significant, it also leaves out a big group that is also suing the government. chief washington correspondent james rosen tells us what triggered the change. >> under the new rules proposed by health and human services secretary kathleen sebelius non-profit religious employers will be able to opt out of the obamacare mandate of female contraceptive in the healthcare plan. instead insurers will be required to provide coverage, including standard birth control and items like the morning after pill. the white house says the modifications meet president obama's overarching goals. >> we had to ensure the women have access to preventative services like contraception. the policy also respects religious beliefs. >> catholic league bill donahue held the announcement as a sign of good will toward the catholic community. because the private sector firms with religious objections are not covered by the proposal and many insurance firms ar
poor of all colors stripes tongues and religions that your country wronged you in separate and discrete ways, gronke with horrific and lingering consequences, wronged you in some cases from long ago and for a very long time, to a degree that would morally compel any civilized nation serious and sustained attention. >> guest: we don't want to talk about it. we still don't want to talk about it. we run from it. we now call it victimization, so it's not to be raised. it's a sad truth. >> host: why did you leave the country? >> guest: well i was as much going to a place as leaving a place. i have been going to st. kitts in the caribbean for 25 years, and it's a small island. it is made for someone like me who doesn't like big crowded places, big cities. it's an exquisitely beautiful place with mountains and clear blue water and a kind of smallness that allows the kind of intimacy you seldom go downtown and don't see someone that you know. but the biggest piece of it is that the woman i loved and married is from st. kitts, so we had decided many years ago that we were going to build a home t
or the value of religion and i do think that's one of the reasons why president obama continues the tradition going his fifth he year here. there's something religiously for politicians it's a common language, trying to bridge the gap between themselves and a number of americans. we've heard president obama do that in past years in very real terms. we've learned things about him. last year we learned that he prays every day. he said he gets up in the morning, says a brief prayer and spends some time in scripture and devotion and obviously talking i think a lot in evangelical tones at the time you look at it in this event that, yes, it's not supposed to be a political event, but it was in an election year where a number of normally, i would say evangelical republican supporters had questions about mitt romney and you saw president obama maybe able to seize this moment, so i think sometimes it serves a political opportunity. sometimes it serves this sort of, serves as an opportunity for the president to reach out, and certainly at a time right now when he's dealing with some very divisive issue
religions, so so religion does well. this whole wall behind me is paperback fiction, and that rolls out of here on a steady basis both to locals and to visitors who want something light to read while they're traveling and nothing tooer the or my important -- too terribly important. the opera breakfast meets here all winter long before the simulcasts from the metropolitan opera which comes to santa fe along with millions of other viewers across the world. and there's a breakfast here and a lecture, so we do a lot with music, a lot with art and pretty much everything. the history of santa fe is rooted in three major cultures; the native american, the his hispanic and the anglo. now that's, obviously, oversimplifying things. but each one carries a heritage that the writers are anxious to share. we boast the best of the young native american writers working today up at the indian school. we do events for them here. we boast the best of the spanish colonial art market. we sell books up at the indian market in august which is the large native american art market in the world, and for many yea
religion soaring today. let's head to nicole on the floor of the new york stock exchange. looking very healthy for the stock. nicole: that's right. the stock is soaring today. it's up over 20% when you take a look at it. true religion jeans, right? they are probably $200 a pair. they come out with their numbers. there are some analyst calls and some options for strategic review. i think that's what's really giving this company a boost. let's break it down. you did have bb&t put a buy rating on it. came out with fourth quarter profit which dropped some, but the sales beat the street. and then of course back in october and once again it has resurfaced that execs are saying that a strategic review by a special committee is continuing. so we will see what that means for the company ultimately. i went outside liz tried to bring you right to the store here on wall street give you a little scene of the jeans and such, but it certainly is a winner today. back to you. liz: okay, thank you. there's a major obstacle in the justice department insider trading investigation of steve cohen. charlie g
they are discriminating against other religions. wait until you hear what the school wants to do with them. >> with super bowl sunday days away we have the school and gadgets and game that will help you score big with your next party. first on this day in history back in 1968 the king elvis became a father. elvis' wife priscilla gave birth. hey! did you know that honey nut cheerios has oats that can help lower cholesterol? and it tastes good? sure does! ♪ wow. [ buzz ] delicious, right? yeah. it's the honey, it makes it taste so... ♪ well, would you look at the time... what's the rush? bee happy. bee healthy. with clusters of flakes and o's. oh, ho ho... it's the honey sweetness. i...i mean, you...love. i>> good morning to you. welcome to "fox & friends first". it is friday. you have made it through the workweek. congratulations. it is time for the top 5@5:30. we begin with a fox news alert. it is a third day of the tense hostage negotiation in the state of alabama. a man holding a 5-year-old boy in an under ground bunker. cops haven't officially released the man's name yet but he is known to stay in
take out representatives of the 5 major religions and do the same thing and we model in front of high school and middle school students how the faiths can sit down like we are sitting here today and have conversations about our commonalities but about our differences as well. many of the comments we get from students is, wow, you guys can sit up there and talk because most of the pictures our students see are the ones that have been playing across our screens the last 2 or 3 days. we hope by challenging that we can prevent bullying and harassment we've been seeing here today. >> thank you, amina stacy is manager of communications for the los angeles giants. >> if you think about what our mission is, you probably think our mission is to win the world series every year, which hopefully this year we're on the right track, but actually our mission statement, we just went through an exercise but our mission statement has always been to enrich the community through innovation. and it's very, i am very proud of the fact that the giants have been able to take that mission and bring it into
of resistance to federal rule in new mexico. what is going on today with the rich and diverse bodies of religion in santa fe, but we constructed that on top of this foundation of faith being part of santa fe's history from the very start. santa fe has been the subject of many books by many writers, a diverse range of writers, and this book has a terrific bibliography for anyone who wants to read more about santa fe. >> and now more from santa fe, new mexico, home to about 80,000 people and 250 art galleries. santa fe boasts a rich historical and literary culture. with the help of our local cable partner, comcast, booktv takes a tour of collected works bookstore, one of santa fe's 17 independent bookstores. >> welcome to collected works bookstore and coffeehouse. we're in santa fe, new mexico. my name is dorothy massey, and my daughter and co-owner have owned collected works for the last 18 of its now 35 years old as santa fe's oldest and, we think, best in the city. santa fe has a population of 80,000 people, and it supports no less than 17 independent bookstores. how does collected works and th
's affiliated in a nonprofit way with a religion and against your beliefs, for example if you are a university or if you are a health system, they have made accommodations to ensure that you don't have to be involved in the direct provision the payment, the contracting the referral or any of the arrangements for ensuring that -- >> what about -- what about private companies like hobby lobby? the owners object on, you know, moral reasons that they don't want to pay for contraception for their employer, employees. >> i know folks have tried to talk about this as a religious liberty issue. that feels a bit like a smoke screen for folks who are really trying to impose their views about birth control on others. there is nothing in this law which in any way impedes an employer's ability to exercise his or her own religious beliefs. but there is nothing which says that religious liberty requires you to impose your beliefs on others. and by allowing for these accommodations for religious institutions but ensuring that -- in the private sector, if you are a business that's operating in the public secto
's great religions. it is a feast for the eyes and millions of pilgrims have already arrived. a sea of humanity on india's ganges river. we've waited 12 years for this festival to come around again so we sent holly williams to witness the spectacle. >> reporter: from every corner of india and by every conceivable mode of transport pilgrims are making their way to prayag, the holiest place in the hindu world for the biggest celebration on the hindu calendar the maha kumbh mela held only once every 12 years. born by their shared faith, they come here to purify themselves by bathing in the ganges the river that nurtured india's 5 civilization. om kumar is a wheat farmer from central india who told us he walked 300 miles to get here. why did you come from so far away? he made the journey, he said because the water has special power. for hindus the ganges suzuki a sacred river and they believe that bathing here during the kumbh mela will wash away their signs. the pilgrims have set up camp in a sprawling city of tents complete with banks, its own police force and traffic jams. but on sun
is to us. that's partly for from morals, partly from religion, it's also from the law. and these young ones, these kids didn't have their that influence last long enough to draw them into an ordered society. >> rose: so what was the primary influence of the private catholic school you went to. >> to help me choose to be a good person. >> rose: your parents taught you that? >> they didn't tell you, they taught in the a lot by example. and discipline, obviously. i talk a lot about -- >> rose: i'm sure they disciplined you. >> oh, they did, in not always such nice ways. i describe that in the book. but they talk to you about the choice we had as people. to be good or bad people. and they taught about the consequences of that in the afterlife but it seeped into understanding that to choose to be a good person was, a, a choice and, b, one with importance. and to me that's an eternal gift. as you may know, my grammar school is being closed by the archdiocese. >> rose: i do know that. and >> and i am so incredibly heartbroken because my grammar school and almost all on that list are all inner city
race, age, national origin, religion, pregnancy, those amiable characteristics we think are worthy of the protections of our civil rights laws. in most states, there are modest exemptions to this employment at will doctrine around wrongful discharge. when an employer requires somebody to breakable law and order to keep their job or if an employer is doing something that is in violation of some well- defined ridden public policy. other than that, we give employers in this country wide latitude because we have a free market economy, because we recognize the person or entity that takes the risk and sets up the business and puts their monetary and human capital into it, that they have rights to run their businesses the way they see fit. we are very, very reluctant to place any sort of restrictions on that. this is but a small one. i am not saying you have to hire anybody that is not fully qualified. in essence, what these laws do, right now they are saving employers from themselves. if they are ignoring all the unemployed workers, they really could be missing the best qualified person
will be submerged and the arabs will impose sharia or whatever else their islamic religion requires. >> but when you look at the obvious oppression of nearly 2 million palestinians on the gaza strip in particular, it's a terribly depressing -- >> sure. >> helpless situation. >> and they could change it. they could change it. >> can only they change it or do the israelis have to also give a little bit? >> of course. >> everything about compromise? >> of course the israelis have to give, and they will. and omar, who was the prime minister, said he was within a hair's breadth of dealing with abu abbas, but it's the fear that the palestinian leadership has that if they enter into a treaty with israel, they will be murdered. >> when you see the political rhetoric being deployed not just there but in washington in particular, it's so vicious now. >> it is. >> you went through a bit of this yourself, very personal in nature. >> yeah. >> when you see it now, is it as bad as it has ever been, do you think? >> worse. i enjoyed my stay in congress. most people today do not. too many people who have been electe
, religion, etc. discrimination in the fact as opposed to judging the size of eggs or something, being discriminate. and so by giving it a name, it started to have its own life. the ability of a president to name something -- i'm jumping ahead a little bit. but in 1934 franklin d. roosevelt was going to give his annual address to congress. it was from day one in this country the president in the beginning of the year would give an address to the nation and to the congress. and roosevelt in 1934 says, oh, i'll give it a name, calls it the state of the union. so a lot of these testimonies which were sort of created by presidents, we think, are there from day one. in fact, they're ones that have been added later. and, again, some of them are just wonderful. i mean, i'll just jump to a couple. zachary taylor created the term first lady. that did not exist. he applied it to dolly madison. that was the first anyone had ever used that term. he said the first lady of the land. benjamin harrison was keep the ball rolling. i'm jumping around a little bit, but it's sort of fun. woodrow wilson had
of religion without our constitution. the professor says it's up to those who believe in those ideaing to convince fellow americans they are worth withholding. shannon bream, fox news. >> harris: a huge power ball jackpot is up for grabs. we will tell you how much is up for grabs. leaping into frigid waters for a great cause. they do testify year but this time was a little bit different. ♪ using cloud computing and mobile technology, verizon innovators have developed a projective display for firefighters. allowing them to see through anything. because the world's biggest challenges deserve even bigger solutions. powerful answers. verizon. [beep] [indistinct chatter] [kids talking at once] [speaking foreign language] [heart beating] [heartbeat continues] [faint singing] [heartbeat, music playing louder] ♪ i'm feeling better since you know me ♪ ♪ i was a lonely soul, but that's the old me... ♪ announcer: this song was created with heartbeats of children in need. find out how it can help frontline health workers bring hope to millions of children at everybeatmatters.org. >> harr
guarantee things like freedom of religion without our constitution. the professor says it's up to those who believe in those ideaing to convince fellow americans they are worth withholding. shannon bream, fox news. >> harris: a huge power ball jackpot is up for grabs. we will tell you how much is up for grabs. leaping into frigid waters for a great cause. they do testify year but this time was a little bit different. ♪ so, i'm working on a cistern intake valve, and the guy hands me a locknut wrench. no way! i'm like, what is this, a drainpipe slipknot? wherever your business takes you, nobody keeps you on the rd like progressive commercial auto. [ flo speaking japanese ] [ shouting in japanese ] we work wherever you work. now, that's progressive. call or click today. >> harris: pony chilling day out for a good cause. thick skinned new yorkers stripping down and taking a dip in the ice cold atlantic for the rock away plunge raising money for a teenager suffering from a life threatening disease. this year had it had a any purpose. >> we're having a plunge that is usually for cystic fibrosis
of the kickoff changed. they're more aggressive penalties being called so the nfl really does have the religion now and it's a question of whether they can resolve this body of claims by the 4,000 former players, set those aside. deal with them in a straight-up way and then move ahead to try to make the game safer. >> paul barrett, thanks very much for injoing us. >> my pleasure. >> president obama weighed in. >> some of the concerns we have learned about have to give parents pause and, you know, as i said before, i feel differently about the nfl. these are grown men. pop warner high school, college. i want to make sure that we're doing everything we can to make the sport safer. >> so do you think we need to change the way the game is played in order to ensure player safety? peggy brand says, i think what the nfl is doing right now is a step in the right direction. i'm glad my son decided to stop playing in seventh grade. i probably want to ask him to stop. like us on facebook and join the conversation. >>> up next, undaunted. from the home front to the combat zone. the author whose stories of
about history, religion, politics. >> you don't love your child any less because they have a mental illness. you love them probably more. sometimes i think elliot was put here on earth for us just to see if we could make it through. >> i'm a good person. >> smart. >> smart and talented. >> beat dad on jeopardy. >> usually beat dad on jeopardy. >> a lot of memories in those books. >> misdiagnosed with add as a first grader. it took years for elliot to get the correct diagnosis. asasberger's syndrome. often repetitive behaviors. he also has a mental illness. psychosis, a loss of contact with reality. >> he actually went out to a dumpster, they were building a new home, and started banging his head on the dumpster. if that doesn't break your heart, i don't know what does. to see someone go through that and now to look at elliot. >> i was delusional. >> you were delusional, but you're doing so good now. >> there were years of heartbreak and struggle. he head butted his father and the family was forced to call 911. >> elliot was thrown to the ground by a police officer, shack
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 141 (some duplicates have been removed)

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